Nelson Drug Alert

Interior Health – Nelson

Down in Nelson has been found to contain high levels of fentanyl, fluorofentanyl and benzos.

Sold as Down, Fentanyl.

 

Contains:

8% Fentanyl

21% Fluorofentanyl (Fentanyl analogue) *

2% Bromazolam (Benzodiazepine)

*Fluorofentanyl potency is not well understood. It can be more potent than standard fentanyl. This means this drug could be very strong.

Risk:

High risk of overdose with severe complications including death. Loss of consciousness is possible. Passing out for long periods and amnesia are also potential effects.

Overdose response:

Naloxone does not work on Benzos, BUT naloxone will work on the opioid overdose symptoms.  After giving breaths and naloxone, the person may begin breathing normally, but may not wake up. More doses of naloxone should only be given if the person is not breathing normally (less than 10 breaths a minute). If the person is breathing normally but remains unconscious, place in recovery position and stay with them until emergency services arrive.

No matter what or how you use (oral, smoking, snorting, injecting) take steps to prevent overdose

  • Know the risks when mixing drugs
  • If you must use while alone, consider using the Lifeguard app which can connect you with 911 emergency responders if you overdose. Download at the App Store or Google Play.   
  • When using your substance start with a small amount, and then go slow.
  • Use with others or at an Overdose Prevention or Supervised Consumption Site, if one is near you.
  • Know how to respond to an overdose – call 911, give rescue breaths and naloxone.

 

Here is a link to download a printable version of this poster.

Trail and area Drug Alert

Interior Health – Trail

Down in Trail has been found to contain Fentanyl (34%), Benzodiazepines (Bromazolam 4%, Flubromazepam 1%) alongside with caffeine. These results are accurate as they have been verified by PS-MS at Substance (UVIC).

Risk:

High risk of overdose and death. Risk of unconsciousness not resolved by Naloxone.

Symptoms:

More drowsy than usual, Memory Loss, Nausea, Heavy Nod, Dizziness, Associated with multiple overdoses.

Overdose response:

Naloxone does not work on Benzos, BUT naloxone will work on the opioid overdose symptoms.  After giving breaths and naloxone, the person may begin breathing normally, but may not wake up. More doses of naloxone should only be given if the person is not breathing normally (less than 10 breaths a minute). If the person is breathing normally but remains unconscious, place in recovery position and stay with them until emergency services arrive.

No matter what or how you use (oral, smoking, snorting, injecting) take steps to prevent overdose

  • Before using, get your drugs checked to find out if what your Down contains.
  • Find locations at www.drugchecking.ca
  • Be aware of possible heavy sedation
  • Be aware of risk if mixing with other drugs, including alcohol
  • Use with others around or at an Overdose Prevention Site (OPS)
  • Start with a small amount and space out your doses
  • Carry naloxone and know how to use it
  • Get the LifeGuard App – lifeguarddh.com
  • Call 211 or visit bc211.ca to find services near you

Here is a link to download a printable version of this poster.

Nelson Drug Alert

Interior Health – Nelson

Meth in Nelson has been found to also contain fentanyl and benzos.

Sold as Meth, Side, Methamphetamine. Test your meth for presence of fentanyl!

Risk:

Risk of overdose with severe complications including death.

Overdose response:

Naloxone does not work on Benzos, BUT naloxone will work on the opioid overdose symptoms.  After giving breaths and naloxone, the person may begin breathing normally, but may not wake up. More doses of naloxone should only be given if the person is not breathing normally (less than 10 breaths a minute). If the person is breathing normally but remains unconscious, place in recovery position and stay with them until emergency services arrive.

No matter what or how you use (oral, smoking, snorting, injecting) take steps to prevent overdose

  • Know the risks when mixing drugs
  • If you must use while alone, consider using the Lifeguard app which can connect you with 911 emergency responders if you overdose. Download at the App Store or Google Play.   
  • When using your substance start with a small amount, and then go slow.
  • Use with others or at an Overdose Prevention or Supervised Consumption Site, if one is near you.
  • Know how to respond to an overdose – call 911, give rescue breaths and naloxone.

 

Here is a link to download a printable version of this poster.

ANKORS Nelson – Drug Checking Report – Week of February 17, 2022

It was a busy week for drug checking at ANKORS in Nelson. They were in Grand Forks on Tuesday and in Trail on Wednesday for testing – the rest of the week was spent in Nelson. Please find details in attached report.

View full report here.

When Ketamine is not Ketamine.

Testing ketamine highly recommended for West Kootenay Communities!

A white crystalline powder with the appearance of ketamine is circulating in the West Kootenays. Sold as ketamine or K, it actually tests as an intermediate chemical for the synthesis of opioids with nothing else detected.  There is no history of human use for this substance and thus, we are not able to tell what dangers may be associated with it. According to people who have tried it, it has no noticeable effect.

There has also been occurrence of this unusual chemical appearing mixed together with ketamine. This means that even if the ketamine you have seems to have some effect, there is still a risk of taking a substance with no record of it having been tried by humans.

To see pictures of the ketamine tested, check out the results page by clicking here.

We highly recommend testing your Ketamine, especially if it has been acquired recently!

ANKORS in Nelson is open for testing:

Monday and Thursday, as well as sometimes Wednesday depending on mobile testing hours
9:30-4:30, with a break for lunch from 12-1
Samples can be dropped off anytime.

ANKORS also has a mobile testing operation! Learn more about it here: Drug checking comes to Grand Forks, Castlegar, and Trail!

ANKORS Nelson – Drug Checking Report – Week of February 3, 2022

It was a busy week for drug checking at ANKORS in Nelson. They were in Grand Forks on Tuesday and in Trail on Wednesday for testing – the rest of the week was spent in Nelson. Overall, ANKORS tested 25 samples: nine samples in Grand Forks, six in Trail, and ten in Nelson. The substances were as follows: 12 down samples, seven MDMA samples, five methamphetamine samples, and one ketamine sample.

View full report here.

ANKORS Nelson – Drug Checking Report – Week of November 18, 2021

This week 8 samples were tested in Trail. The down samples were fairly typical for these days, with average fentanyl proportions. One sample that was of sold as ketamine was actually methamphetamine. The sample was sold and bought in Calgary, and therefore these results may not pose serious concern to people who are using drugs in the Kootenay/Boundary or Interior Health region. However, it serves as a reminder to have your drugs checked before using, start with a small amount, and use with a buddy or in an overdose prevention site/supervised consumption site.

ANKORS Nelson – Drug Checking Report – Week of October 4, 2021

This week at ANKORS we tested a large variety of down samples of varying colours. The fentanyl content of these samples was consistent with recent trends, at about 10%. What is more concerning, however, is that all of the down samples tested positive for benzodiazepines using benzodiazepine test strips.

When used with fentanyl or other opioids, benzodiazepines have synergistic effects. Down samples with benzodiazepines or their analogues can increase the chance of overdose, and often cause atypical overdose responses. Benzodiazepines do not respond to naloxone; therefore it is important to give breaths when responding to an atypical overdose. Please continue to encourage people who are using drugs to have their drugs checked, to start slow, and to refrain from using alone.

While drug checking can help reduce the risk of using drugs by allowing users to make better informed decisions, please recognize that the use of FTIR spectrometry and test strips has limitations. Notably, the FTIR cannot detect substances that are present in small amounts or substances that are absent from the reference database. No drug use is completely safe, and checking your drugs does not eliminate all risk.

ANKORS Nelson – Drug Checking Report – Week of Sept 19, 2021

On Wednesday this week, ANKORS set up a pop up OPS and testing site next to the United Church in Trail. It was successful for a first event, not only to help folks get their stuff tested and consume drugs  in a safer environment, but also to connect together people involved with the opioid crisis in the region! On top of that, it gave an opportunity for the local population to see what these services can bring to the community.

In Trail, we tested typical samples of side (Methamphetamine) and Down (Fentanyl or analog).

Notable finds include:

A brown powder looking like compact cacao powder, tested as having a strong concentration of fentanyl as well as presence of benzodiazepine. Please tread cautiously if you see this one around, as it looks like a mixture that could easily create a situation of overdose that is hard to deal with.

A sample that was recurring was a beige chunky substance that tested low in fentanyl but still gave strong effects, as anecdotally reported by those who were getting it tested.  It could  contain a potent analogue of Fentanyl. It tested negative for benzos.

As for ANKORS in Nelson, we tested samples of MDMA that were actually MDA. This is a great reason to come in and use the drug checking service!

We are open for testing next Wednesday but are closed for National Reconciliation day on the Thursday. As always, safe and discrete 24/7 drop off  is available through our mailing slot in an envelope with some contact info.

Please don’t hesitate to reach out if you have any questions